Tag Archives: linen

Folkwear #108 Turkish Dancer Jacket

Do you see a jacket on the pattern cover?

I didn’t, at first.  In a previous post about this pattern, I wrote about my linen sundress.

I wore this dress when I was at Quilt Canada helping my friend Catherine, owner of Distinctive Sewing Supplies.  It was a popular pattern, and so was the fabric.  Both sold well.  But, I was cold.  I needed sleeves, there was a jacket pattern included with Turkish Dancer, AND Distinctive Sewing Supplies had the perfect fabric.

Sew, a jacket was born!  My disclaimer; the fabric was supplied to me at no charge in exchange for my making and writing about the jacket.  Again, it’s my pleasure. 

Every single piece of fabric I have from Distinctive Sewing Supplies has been great to sew.  I’ve had no surprises, each piece has been exactly as it was described on the website. 

I traced off a size medium, lengthening the body and the sleeves by 2 inches. 

Only 3 pieces, it didn’t take long to cut out. 

The edges are designed to be finished with bias binding turned to the inside, but I wanted to take it up a notch.  I like the idea of bias binding, but chose to turn it to the out-side and leave the edge raw, unfinished, and brushed for texture.  The inside is smooth and perfectly finished.

frayed bias binding
bias trim

I cut enough 1.25 inch wide strips to go around the entire jacket as well as the bottoms of both sleeves then joined them to make one long strip.  The seam allowance was trimmed to 1/4inch and pressed open.

The only change I made to the pattern, other than lengthening it, was to round off the bottom front a bit by tracing a container and trimming off the excess.

Construction of the jacket was simple, and I used my serger to finish the edges.  I also used my serger with the differential set to the largest setting to gather the sleeve caps between the notches. 

After setting in the sleeves and sewing the side seams it was time to apply the prepared bias trim.  I started at the bottom dean a side-seam and sewed the right side of the trim (using 1/4 inch seam allowance) to the wrong side of the jacket.  I left a bit un-sewn at the beginning so I could join the strip at the end.  After joining the beginning and ending on the bias and pressing the seam allowance open, I completed attaching it and trimmed off the points.

To finish it, fold the trim to the right side, wrapping the seam allowance.  Sew from the wrong side, “in the ditch”.

I used a toothbrush to fluff the raw edge.

 

 

inside
back
jacket
right side

What do you think?  I love this little jacket and will make more.

I’d love to read some comments……..

Turkish Dancer, my Dress

I’m not going to use the work “hack” for my changes.  

Here’s why:

Definition of hack (according to Merriam Webster

 

  • 1 a :  to cut or sever with repeated irregular or unskillful blows

  • b :  to cut or shape by or as if by crude or ruthless strokes hacking out new election districts

  • c :  annoy, vex —often used with off He gets really hacked off when people cheat.

  • 2 :  to clear or make by or as if by cutting away vegetation hacked his way through the brush

  • 3 a :  to manage successfully just couldn’t hack the new job : 

  • b :  tolerate I can’t hack all this noise

None of those definitions describe the thought and care that go into modifying a sewing pattern.  Perhaps “mod” is a good substitute word.  What are your thoughts?

Here’s how I changed, modified, adapted Folkwear Turkish Dancer Dress #108 into a sleeveless dress.

Let me start by saying that I NEVER cut out a “master pattern”.  Anymore.  The last time I cut out a master pattern I cut a size too small.  Nowadays I trace, using the thin but strong medical paper that Distinctive Sewing Supplies sells by the roll. 

To add for a larger front overlap:

I drew a line 1 inch away from the edge of the paper, parallel with the straight edge, as long as the front pattern piece,  then lined up the original center front on the new line before beginning to trace the front.  This added one inch extra on the center front. You can see the original pattern easily through the tracing paper.

I used a dressmaker curve to “true” the lower neck curve, ignoring the pointy self-facing.  You can see the original pattern through the paper.

using dressmakers curve for neckline
drawn curve

I also shortened the dress length by 12 inches which still gave me a 1 inch hem allowance.  To mark an even hem line I measured up from the bottom and marked the pattern at even intervals then just joined the marks.

 After cutting out the dress in both the linen and voile I lined each piece (2 fronts and a back) with the voile and serged around the outer edge to treat each inner lined piece as one. 

Cut strips of 1 inch wide medium weight interfacing and fuse them to the inside (on the voile) edges of the fronts.

The sewing was quick and easy.  I marked the darts and sewed them from the middle out to the points.  Then joined the shoulders. 

I finished the neckline, armholes and the fronts with self-made bias binding.  I had enough voile left from the original amount of 1 1/2 meters to make enough 2 inch wide bias strips for it all.  I pressed 2 inch wide bias in half length-ways with wrong sides together, then sewed the raw edges around the neckline first, using a 3/8″ seam allowance, and leaving about 1 1/2 inches extra at each end. 

right sides together
pinned
right side

Fold the binding and the seam allowance to the inside and stitch close to the fold of the binding.  Don’t trim off the extra ends yet.

Finish the armholes the same way, BEFORE sewing the side seams.

 

I also finished the edges of the fronts with the first step of the binding, then trimming off the extra neck binding.  Leave a bit of extra binding at the top and bottom. Press the folded edge out over the seam allowance, it should just extend over the edge of the fabric a tiny bit.

Sew the side seams and press up the hem by 1 inch. 

To finish the fronts, I folded in one inch, tucked under the tail of bias, and pressed.  (the edge of the fusible interfacing is the fold line)  To hold the front facings in  I stitched where the black line is in the photo below, then followed the folded edge of the binding all the way to the hem, and back stitched.  Did the same for the other side of the front, then stitched up the hem.

Buttonholes and buttons, and ready to wear. 

I love my dress! 

Both the linen print and the cotton voile lining were given to me by Distinctive Sewing Supplies in exchange for making the dress and documenting my pattern changes.

For a printable PDF describing my pattern “mods” please click here.

Turkish Dancer to Dress How-to

Old Mexico Dress/Blouse

I’ve had this pattern, Old Mexico Dress by Folkwear in my collection for a while now, it was given to me by my friend Catherine last year in exchange for modelling for Distinctive Sewing Supplies at the CreativFestival.  My intention was (and it might still happen) to make a summer nightgown for one of my daughters in a lightweight cotton voile.

Catherine made the dress in a dark coloured rayon batik, and it convinced me to make one for myself.  The pattern comes in 3 suggested lengths, blouse, hip and dress.  The hip length appealed to me, to wear over slim jeans, and I had the perfect piece of fabric. 

I traced off the pattern in size medium, checked the finished length (it was fine) , then pinned and cut out my blouse. 

As a certified Islander Sewing System teacher, I often analyze construction methods and adapt them to make my sewing easier and more professional.

Attaching the pleated front and back into the yoke was made much easier using the “burrito method”.  (And appropriate, too, for a Mexican pattern) Note how tidy the inside is.

I also sewed the sleeves in flat, (using my serger) instead of “inserting” them, then serged the side-seam up to, but not including the pre-pressed sleeve hem.

The sleeve hems and the bottom were finished with a single needle top-stitch, and a light pressing.  Done.  Now I’m ready for some warm weather.

Do you have this pattern?  Have you made it?  Thoughts?