Tag Archives: pattern

Jalie Raglan Tee 3245

You might recognize this pattern, it’s the same one I used to make the racer-back  cami (view C) shown on the bottom left. 

Read about it by clicking here.

 

I received this piece of fabric from Distinctive Sewing Supplies to make view B, without the pockets.  It’s 60 inches wide and 95% Rayon 5% Spandex

If you want a new Tee for your wardrobe, and like the idea of a raglan sleeve, you need to make this!  All the sewing was complete in an hour, and the hemming will take less than that, so it’s a “2 HOUR TEE”.

I chose to make a size that is 3 up from my body measurements.  That’s my personal choice. 

My suggestion is to measure the finished width of a top or two that you like the fit of and use that as a guide. 

The neck binding went really smoothly, and I love the way this fabric drapes.  A warning though; it’s very soft and stretchy, and my rough hands meant the fabric clung to my fingers.  Hand lotion solved that problem.

My disclaimer; I received the piece of beautiful Rayon Spandex in my favourite shades of blue from Distinctive Sewing Supplies in exchange for blogging about my experience.  Please know that the opinions expressed are my own.

I liked making this pattern so much that I ordered another fabric from Distinctive Sewing Supplies that I’d been lusting after.  It’s a 85% Poly 10% Rayon 5% Spandex and I’ll be sewing it up using this same pattern as soon as possible.  Of course I’m going to make a change, I’ll raise the front neckline by 2 inches.  Watch for a review in a few weeks.

Jalie Stretch Jeans 2908, The Fly Zipper

Does the mere thought of sewing a fly zipper give you a hot flash?

There are many steps, but each single step was easy.  If you’ve not done this before, don’t be afraid.  The instructions included with this pattern were pretty good. 

My disclaimer; I received this pattern and the piece of beautiful stretch denim from Distinctive Sewing Supplies in exchange for blogging about my experience.  Please know that the opinions expressed will be my own.

I had one moment when what I thought I was reading, wasn’t.  Step 24(a) reads:  On right side of front, top-stitch 3 mm (1/8’’) right of center front (fig. 24a – view from right side of front.

As you see it, not as you wear it.

After that it was clear sailing.  So clear, that I forgot to stop and take photos.  Duh!  And I specifically chose a light blue zipper so it would show up in the pics.  Double Duh!

finished fly extensions
fly complete
pinned zipper

I’m going to do a separate post on just the fly zipper. I owe you!

And here it is, a 2 page printable PDF  Fly Tutorial Jalie 2908

And here’s the blog post about it.

The waistband is sewn to the inside of the jeans first, then top-stitched into place.  Before I did the top-stitching, I slipped a square of medium weight fusible interfacing between the layers in the area of the buttonhole placement.  And fused it place with a hot steamy iron.

I sewed the bottom of the waistband to the right side with matching thread BEFORE I top-stitched.  Just in case.  And guess what?  I had to un-stitch a bit and re-do it.  The waistband is cut on the bias, and I had a ripple. 

The top end of the belt-loop gets tucked under by 3/8 inch.  I found it easier to mark the cutting line AND the fold line.

Then I sewed back and forth a few times following the same line as the top-stitching.

My first attempt at the buttonhole was pretty crooked.  And yes, I did make a sample on scrap denim first.  So was my 2nd and 3rd attempt.  This fabric took to picking out really well, thank goodness.  I decided to choose a different style of buttonhole and it worked perfectly.

All the sewing is complete. 

All that remains is to attach the “jeans button”, and take some pics. 

 

I started and ended my top-stitching there, so it doesn’t show when I wear them.

Jalie 2908 front
Jalie 2908 side front
Jalie 2908 leg
Jalie 2908 front pocket
Jalie 2908 back
Jalie 2908 complete

 In spite of the fact that my waist measures 2 inches larger than the pattern, (I made size “Y”), the fact that the waistband is cut on the bias makes it work for me.

Sew a Bag for Fluffy Microwaved Potatoes

 

Yes, these are sew fast to make up that you still have time to whip up a few before Christmas,      IF      you have the right scrim-free batting.

This is the one I use, and one package will make 6.  Your local quilt shop might carry it, if not,

I get mine here; at Amazon.ca

 

 

 

 

 

 

To make one bag, you’ll need 2 pieces of quilters cotton, 12 inches by 22 inches, and one piece of scrim-free batting 12″ x 22″

If you open out the batting like this diagram, you can cut 6 from one piece with very little waste.

Place your 2 pieces of quilters cotton with right sides together, then smooth the batting on top with all edges even.  Turn it over so the batting is on the bottom, and using 100% cotton thread and 1/4″ seam allowance, sew the 2 short ends through all layers.  I found it fed better with the batting down, and my Dual Feed foot was my best friend.

Trim the seam allowance to 1/8th ” , then turn right sides out so the batting is in between the fabric.  Press with iron to flatten, then top-stitch along each short end.

I quilted this  flat piece about 5 inches apart using cotton thread.  I suspect these will end up in the laundry, and I don’t want the batting to bunch up.

With right side up, fold one short end in toward the middle by 2 inches.  Bring the other short end over so it’s 1/4″ from the fold and pin or clip to hold.

Sew up the sides, using a generous 1/4 inch seam allowance.  Trim close to the stitching, then turn right side out.  Poke out the corners carefully, then press well with the iron to flatten.  Top-stitch 1/4 inch from each side to hide the raw edges.

To use:  Wash and dry baking potatoes.  No need to poke holes in them.  Wrap in a dry paper towel and insert into the bag.  Microwave for the correct length of time according to your oven.

I use a piece of clean cotton muslin instead of the paper towel to save garbage.

This bag is large enough for corn, too.

Here’s a PDF of the instructions, as well as a page with 4 sets of cooking instructions.   If you don’t want to print them, only print page 1.

baked potato bag

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s Sew a Mug Tote

A Mug Tote! 

What a great idea!  How great is this idea?

  • I love to sew
  • It’s fun and easy to sew
  • It uses scraps
  • It makes a great gift
  • It protects my mug when I take it somewhere
  • It makes a great blog post

Many thanks to my friend Joyce; she brought one to Sewing Social in Trenton last week and a lot of us got excited to sew one.  I offered to write a pattern, and here’s the result.

Here’s the supply list in case you want to get started, BUT, I’m not going to post the instructions here until December 13th.  If you’re a subscriber, you’ll receive a notice by email, if you’re not a subscriber, you can do so by filling in your email addy at the top left of this page.

Outer layer, 1 piece 10 inches x 14 1/2 inches and a 5 inch circle for the bottom.

1 piece of batting or fusible fleece 14 inches x 6 1/2 inches.

For lining, 1 piece 10 inches x 14 1/2 inches and a 5 inch circle for the bottom.

25 inches of narrow ribbon for the tie.

2 strips of 1/4 inch wide paper backed fusible web 14 1/2 inches long. 

One 4 1/2 inch diameter sour cream container lid

Matching sewing thread.

And here are the instructions, happy stitching!

Free Pattern for Mug Tote

An Easy Tanktop with Style

I’ve been spending a lot of time in my garden, enjoying my vegies, planting the last of the seeds, watching the critters at the feeders, and taking lots of pictures.

As a result, I’m getting a golden glow on my arms.  But my shoulders and upper arms are white, so, it was time to sew a tank-top or two.  For a mature person.  No gaping, no bra straps showing. Continue reading An Easy Tanktop with Style

Leggings for Barbie, a Free Pattern

navy leggings

 Every well dressed Barbie needs leggings, and the more the merrier.  If you cut out a few pairs of these in colours that are “family” you could sew them without changing your thread colours.  Just saying.

This pattern has been designed for a 4-way stretch, in other words, it stretches in all directions.  These fabrics can be a bit challenging, and I have included some sewing tips on my pattern sheet.  Download it at the bottom of this page.

Are you making any of these?   I’d love to see your creations, just email them to me at yvettechilcott(at)yahoo(dot)ca

here’s the link to the pattern:

leggings

Microwave Cozy for your Dinner Plate

No more burnt fingers!

Don’t you just dread taking a plate of reheated food from the microwave?  Oven mitts can be so bulky and awkward.

Here’s my solution; a plate cozy.  Click to open a PDF, then save it if you’d like.

plate cozy

I also have an instructable for a bowl cozy, click to open it.soup bowl cozy

Soup bowl cozy

Vacation Sew and Serge with MacPhee Patterns

It’s vacation time!  What a great excuse to sew some new clothes!

Using mostly MacPhee Workshop patterns, my suitcase is packed.

I’ve packed 2 pairs of culotte length #407, “Wrap Pant” and 1 full length pair in a white crinkle cotton.2014-06-16 11.49.21IMG_2564

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s one of the  #336 Two Hour Tunic Tops.

doneI still wanted a pair of wide legged pants, so I modified the Classic Pant395 by making the legs wider, and adding a fold-over waist finish.  I love how these feel and fit.IMG_2556  The fabric is an ITY knit, available from Distinctive Sewing Supplies, an on-line supplier in Oakville.  Stretchy, non-wrinkle and cool to wear.  

I had a piece of a co-ordinating  solid and made a simple top using 303_20120828150611#303 Classic Top and Dress.

 

 

Then, using the same pattern, I made the dress in a piece of fabric from my stash.IMG_2563  It’s mid calf with side slits, and I really like it.

There!  I’m ready to go, and taking Linda MacPhee on vacation with me!  And she doesn’t even know!

Hats in Knit-Weave on the Knitting Machine

IMG_1152Something new from my knitting machine; knit-woven hats. 

These are machine knit on a standard gauge, Brother 894 with ribber to be specific. 

Most of us have these “odd-balls” of novelty yarns hanging around.  Usually we buy them when they’re on sale, because they’re expensive.  And it takes lots of these to make anything.  Usually I buy one or two, figuring on using it as a trim.IMG_1162

By incorporating these textured yarns into knit-weave,  they go much farther.  I got 2 hats from the yarn at the right with about 4 yards left over.

The method I chose for the actual knit-weave was introduced to me in the 1980’s, first by Daphne St Just, then a few years later by Daphne’s teacher and mentor, Audrey Palmer.  This method is more about the yarns and less about the punch-card pattern.

A fairly fine yarn is used for the knitting, and a textured, or multi-coloured yarn is chosen for the weaving.

Most of the garments produced by this method have card #1, locked on the first row.  The resulting fabric is then steam pressed heavily to produce a soft draping knit fabric.

IMG_1155 IMG_1160This hat uses a fine 4-ply and a soft, textured Aran, steamed gently to soften the fabric.

 

 

 

This hat also uses the fine 4-ply as the base, the weaving yarn is an inexpensive variegated worsted weight, steamed as well.

Have you tried knit-weaving?  What were your results like? 

The pattern for my hats may be purchased here: