Tag Archives: tutorial

Turkish Dancer Dress Folkwear 108

 

My dress is finished!

This beautiful linen caught my eye as soon as it was unpacked when we set up the Distinctive Sewing Supply booth at last month’s Creativfestival. The pattern is  Folkwear design called a Turkish Dancer Dress, #108, but you’d never guess from looking at the cover of the pattern.

The “V” of the neck looks very low, (it isn’t).

My linen dress is fully underlined with a cotton voile, and I’ll wear it as soon as it gets warm enough.

I omitted the sleeves and the side slits, shortened the length by 12 inches, and overlapped the front by 1 inch.

I made another version of the same dress a couple of years ago,  in a linen/cotton blend, but the fabric was heavier so it didn’t need the underlining.  I love the slightly extended shoulder and the slight upward curve of the shoulder at the neck.  The neckline and armholes are finished with self-made bias binding.

My disclosure:  The beautiful linen and the cotton voile for the interlining was provided to me at no charge by Distinctive Sewing Supplies in exchange for writing a review of the fabric and a tutorial for the pattern changes.   And just sew you know, I would have bought the fabrics anyway.  I LOVE them! 

(I already had the pattern)  Pre-order yours from Distinctive Sewing Supplies by clicking here.

They arrive with labels:

Both fabrics, the linen and the cotton voile were soaked in Eucalan for 20 minutes, then rinsed and tumble dried at low heat for about 20 minutes.  Both fabrics came out of the drier looking a bit “rumpled”, but not enough that I felt I had to iron them.  Smoothing them with my hands on the cutting table was enough.

My next post will detail the simple adjustments to the pattern.

Fly Tutorial with Photos for Jalie Stretch Jeans 2908

Remember these jeans?

These are  my jeans using Jalie Stretch Jeans 2908.  (If you want to read the post, please click here)

In that post I stated that I would write a tutorial on the fly front zipper.  Since then I’ve sewn many more garments, but I hadn’t forgotten.  Just lately I helped my friend Suzanne work through the fly front, step by step, and realized that the tutorial might have helped her.

I cut out a pair of fronts in the smallest size, and the fly shield, which I made longer by about 3/4 inch.  On my jeans they seemed to have gotten smaller as I sewed, so from now on I’ll add a bit. 

I used a cream coloured twill, an orange zipper and dark green thread.  It’s not pretty, but it worked.  I took pictures of each step and put a tutorial together as a 2 page PDF download.Please click here for the tutorial.  Fly Tutorial Jalie 2908

Have you sewn a fly front?  Did you have any problems with it?

And please, if you have any questions about the tutorial, please let me know.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Front Pockets on Jalie 2908, Stretch Jeans

My disclaimer; I received this pattern and a piece of beautiful stretch denim from Distinctive Sewing Supplies in exchange for blogging about my experience.  Please know that the opinions expressed will be my own.

This is the view I’m making, but it will fit even a bit higher at my waist. 

Part 1, Getting Started (My alterations and top-stitching the back pockets) click here

Part 2, The Backside, click here

BTW, do you know you can go to the Jalie website and download the instructions?  They’re available in French and English as a PDF and you can print the pages you need.

 The next sewing step is completing the lined front pockets.  I chose a turquoise coloured batik for the lining. 

There are 3 pattern pieces to these pockets.

Shown are the pieces for the regular rise jeans, the ones for the low rise are similar, but shorter.  The Front Pocket Yoke is cut from your jean fabric, the other two from lining.

The instructions were very clear, and the pockets went together perfectly.

hint:  if you’re using batik for your lining, mark the wrong sides of each piece.

The front pockets are compete with 2 rows of top-stitching.

My next installment will be the fly-zipper!

Are you following this?  Does it make sense so far?  Any questions?

 

Jalie Stretch Jeans 2908, let’s start

Let the process begin!

My disclaimer; I received this pattern and a piece of beautiful stretch denim from Distinctive Sewing Supplies in exchange for blogging about my experience.  Please know that the opinions expressed will be my own.

I pre-treated the denim as suggested, by soaking in a Eucalan solution for 20 minutes, spinning the water out, then tumbling in a warm, not hot, drier for about 20 minutes.  The water that drained off had no denim colour in it, and there was minimal shrinkage.

I selected my pattern size by my hip measurement, as suggested on the envelope. 

This pattern comes in 27 sizes!  I’m an “X”, and like my jeans at my waist, so traced off for View B.

My waist is larger than “X”, but because the waistband is cut on the bias (stretchy) and I’m determined (and working actively at it) to lose weight, I made no adjustments for my girth. 

I DID add 1/2″ in the rise on both front and back, which will add a total of 1 inch to the crotch measurement.

 

I also had to add 1/2 inch to the fly shield and the piece for the fusible interfacing for the fly.

 Cutting out is always an adventure around here!

My choice for the pocket lining reflects my rebellious streak.

It took me ages to decide on a thread colour for my top-stitching.  I really like Sulky 12 weight cotton for this, and have quite a few shades in my collection.  Because these jeans will be part of a “capsule”, I chose a shade of blue that complimented the other fabrics in the group. I sew this thick thread with a Schmetz size 14/90 Topstitch needle.  It’s not too thick, but has a larger eye and deeper groove to accommodate the thread thickness.

Sulky 12 Weight
Schmetz 90 14 topstitch
scarf collar top

Mettler poly in the bobbin, time to sew.  I wanted to stitch something on the pockets to make them “mine” so went to my closet for inspiration.  Now it’s one thing to stitch a free-hand swirl on one pocket, it’s quite different to mirror image the stitching for the other pocket.

I borrowed a trick that quilters use; sewing through paper! So I traced off 2 copies of the pocket onto a scrap of the pattern paper I use to trace off my patterns, drew a “swirl” on one, traced it onto the other piece of paper, then flipped it over and retraced the swirl on the other side.

Then I pinned the paper to each pocket, then with the Sulky 12 weight in the top-stitch needle and my stitch length set at 3.5, stitched along each line, then tore the paper off before stitching an echo line about 1/8 inch on either side of the original. 

Sewing slowly and using my needle-down function as part of the Husqvarna/Viking Sensor System made the stitching fairly easy.

Check back for the next installment.  Please click here

Jalie # 2921 Scarf Collar Top, Sewing it up

It’s time to sew!

This is part two of a three part post about my experience sewing and fitting the Jalie #2921 Scarf collar top. 

Part One is HERE.

ITY can be a bit of a slippery beast to tame, (thanks for that line  Lorna), so I elected to use my sewing machine for construction instead of the serger.  I used a “lightening stitch” (lengthened), 1/4 inch seam allowance and a Stretch 75/11 needle for all the seams.

 I started sewing using my dual feed foot, but soon changed it for my flat bottomed “A” foot.  The constant pressure of the flat foot held the fabric more securely than the dual feed foot.

 The included instructions were very clear and easy to follow.  The diagrams were also very helpful.  The instructions are also available as a stand-alone PDF on the Jalie website, so you can print them and keep them handy.

I followed the instructions provided for the most part, but did make a couple of very minor changes. 

  • Attaching the collar using the burrito method is brilliant!  It’s attached in two stages, first the right side of the scarf is sewn to the wrong side of the garment neckline.  Second, the entire body is rolled up and the other side of the scarf is wrapped around it then sewn from one point, up the length, then along the original seam line and back down the other side.  I found that if I sewed the second step with the first line of stitching up and visible, that I was able to sew directly on top of the original sewing line, so I didn’t have to worry about it showing through to the right side. 

  • I also elected to leave the space for turning along one side instead of the bottom.  For me it made the hand-sewing the opening closed easier.

I did experience some issues with my sewing machine trying to eat my fabric at the beginning and ending of the scarf, but quickly solved it by slipping a scrap of pattern paper underneath the fabric and sewing through it all.  The paper tore away easily afterward.

The rest of the construction went smoothly. 

There is a small opening left unsewn just below the neckline in the center front seam, and that’s where the scarf comes through to the front.  I fused short strips of 1/4 inch wide Steam a Seam to the wrong side of the seam allowances after sewing, peeled off the paper, then fused the seam allowance open to stabilize it.

The hole is hard to see, but it’s between the arrows.

I used this twin needle for all the hems, the fusible knit interfacing made it smooth and easy.

Photo time!  I love this top!  The fabric is sew comfortable to wear, the colour is perfect for me, and the style is a bit dressy, but not too much.  Thank you sew much Catherine and Distinctive Sewing Supplies!

But……

It fits tighter that I’m used to, and with my already long neck, and no cleavage to show off, I feel a bit exposed. 

front left
front right 3
front

Sew……….

I’m going to sew it again, larger, and I’m going to raise the neckline by two inches.

That will be the next post.  Stay tuned…….for Chapter Three

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Microwave Cozy for your Dinner Plate

No more burnt fingers!

Don’t you just dread taking a plate of reheated food from the microwave?  Oven mitts can be so bulky and awkward.

Here’s my solution; a plate cozy.  Click to open a PDF, then save it if you’d like.

plate cozy

I also have an instructable for a bowl cozy, click to open it.soup bowl cozy

Soup bowl cozy

Adding Pockets to Wrap Pants by MacPhee Workshop

My hubby and I are going on vacation this weekend, to a warm place with sand, sun and drinks with little umbrellas in them.

Awesome, I know.  I’m excited and going through my clothes deciding what to pack.  And what to sew.  I love to make at least one new garment for vacation, and decided to change up a pair of wrap pants that I made last year.

I made #407 Wrap Pants by MacPhee workshop last summer out of a gorgeous white crinkle cotton, and although they were “ok”, I wasn’t excited by them.  The fabric was a bit too heavy and they didn’t drape well.  A make-over was in order.  I cut off the waist ties, then re-cut the legs for the other option in Linda’s pattern, the pans with the seam down the front. 

The cut off pieces were more than large enough for pockets.  (You need pockets when you’re on vacation.)

IMG_2540Here’s the shape I drew, 3 inches across the top, 10 inches down the right side, 8″ across the bottom and 5″ up the left.  A curve large enough for my hand finished it.

I serge finished all edges except for the 3″ IMG_2541and 10″, they’ll go into seams.  Then turn under the curved serged edge, top-stitch and press.  Turn under the bottom and 5″ side by about 3/8″ and press.

Pin the wrong side of each pocket to the right side of the back, lining the 3″ side with the top of the pants and the unfinished edge even with the long seam.

IMG_2543Top-stitch the 5″ side and along the bottom.

With right sides together, join the front seams, catching the unfinished edges of the pockets in the seam.

IMG_2545

I had already cut the front down by about an inch to make it a more flattering fit, then used a piece of elastic for the waist.  I joined the short ends with the sewing machine, then quarter pinned it and the waist area.  I used my serger to join the elastic to the pants, making sure my blade didn’t nick the elastic.

Done, because they were already hemmed in the first incarnation.

They’re loose with wide legs, perfect for a warm climate.  I’ve made many of these over the years, both full length and capri length, and love them all.

finishedHave you made these?   What do you think of this unusual pattern?

IMG_2544

 

 

 

 

 

Necklines for Singlebed Knitting Machines

square
1
v 1
roll
2
purl
mock rib
v 2
picot

I wrote a 6 page series of hands-on lessons on neckline finishes for the single bed knitting machine.  Learning the needed skills to produce quality garments is what it’s all about.

I’ve been teaching machine knitting since the early 1980’s, and produced this lesson sheet over time.  My students thought I should publish it so others might benefit from this info.

Square neck, round necks and v necks are included, all for the single bed machine, no ribber required.

These can be knit in standard gauge, mid gauge and bulky, including the Bond frame.

BLT, Best of Linda’s Tops, #311, unwrapped

doneOh Linda MacPhee, I’m inspired!  I sew wanted to make a wrap dress, but couldn’t find just the “right” pattern.  I wanted to use a knit, but didn’t want “tight”.  Then came the AH HA moment.

A few years ago MacPhee Workshop introduced a pattern for a wrap-look pull-over top that crossed conservatively, had a flattering neckline, and had a nice feminine fit.   BLT, the Best of Linda’s Tops, #311.

 

Continue reading BLT, Best of Linda’s Tops, #311, unwrapped