Tag Archives: 3245

Burda Tee Shirt 6749

I still hate/dislike using the “hack” word with my sewing.  But, I guess I’d better learn to live with it…..

because……..

at the Creativfestival, Fall 2017…….

I’m teaching for Distinctive Sewing Supplies!

And one of the classes is:

One Pattern = 3 Different Tees

Working from a commercial sewing pattern with a round (not “V”) neckline, Yvette (that’s me)  will teach some basic pattern personalization, creating 3 adaptations, an inverted front pleat, adding an extended sleeve cap, and adding side drapes.  Suggested patterns include: Jalie 2805, Burda 6749 or 6611

So now not only am I a “Pattern Hacker” but I’ll be teaching others how to “Pattern Hack”.   Go figure.

I made this sample of the inverted front pleat using Burda 6749 in a soft breathable Rayon Spandex Jersey.  I was given the pattern and the fabric by Catherine, owner of Distinctive Sewing Supplies so I could test the pattern and the fabric, write this blog post, and prepare the lesson notes for our upcoming class at the Creativfestival. 

The Pattern:

Product Description;  This style has been especially designed for a close fit and for jersey fabric. The classic pattern can be used for a wide array of attractive tops, both in plain or print fabric. Sew your favourites with either short or long sleeves. Recommended fabrics: Two-way stretch jersey.  Sizes 20 to 34 (all sizes included in pattern).

I made the size 28, in view B for my sample.  I really like the shape of this top, the waist comes in for a nice feminine silhouette or it could be eliminated for a straighter figure.  The shoulders sit smoothly and don’t appear extra wide like in some plus sized patterns.  The neckline has a flattering shape.   I shortened the long sleeves to 3/4.  Many people (like me) push a long sleeve up to just below the elbow anyway.

The Fabric:

The rayon-spandex fabric is soft, breathable and drapey. It is suitable for t-shirts, cardigans and flowing skirts.

Other Details
Content:  95% Rayon 5% Spandex
Width:  148 cm / 58″
Fabric Weight:  190 gsm / 5.6 osy
 
This fabric is very soft, stretchy and is so comfortable to wear.  I’ve found that as I’m aging, my internal thermostat is set high and I’m warm most of the time.  I’ve made a few garments in this fabric and it’s COOL and breathes.  Here’s a link to my post reviewing Jalie Raglan Tee 3245,                  click here.
 

Some Construction Tips:

  • Work on a large surface with no fabric hanging off the edge.
  • if the selvedges seem “pulled” trim them off before pinning your pattern onto the fabric.
  • Use sharp pins.
  • Cut with a rotary cutter, ruler and a mat.
  • Sew with a new needle, I use a 75/11 for knits.
  • Stabilize the neck and front shoulders with a fusible knit interfacing.

More information is coming regarding the Creativfestival Fall 2017 and I’ll keep you updated.  In the meantime, if you’re interested in taking my class, order your pattern soon, to avoid disappointment.  

Are you a “Pattern Hacker”? 

Sew Comfy, Jalie 3245 Raglan Tee in a Sweater Knit

I love this top!  I do love me a raglan, (no shoulders to fit) I love the length, and the fabric is wonderful!  It’s soft, warm, light, stretchy, has memory, and it’s in my favourite colour family.  Buy it here:  Distinctive Sewing Supplies

 

These two are from the same pattern, Jalie 3245, Tee Shirt Raglan, but ended up looking quite different.

to left
left front

For this new version (on the left) I raised the neckline by 2 inches, and shortened the length by one inch.  I also changed the neckline finish from a narrow folded to the front band to a wider attached neckband. (but that wasn’t in the original plan, more on that in a bit)

I like it.  I subscribe to the weekly newsletter from Distinctive Sewing Supplies, and every Friday Catherine sends out a great newsletter.  One of them showed this incredible fabric, and I knew I needed some.

And as soon as it arrived I had stash it up high so “nosy cat” couldn’t tear the bag open.  (He recognizes soft and cozy)

I really like the label on the bag!

I did raise the neckline by two inches, and that involved the area at the front of the raglan sleeve as well.

front neck alteration
neck alteration on sleeve top

 I fused one inch wide strips of knit fusible interfacing along all the neckline edges, which I always do on knits.

 Construction was quick and easy, I used a 4-thread overlock on my serger for all the seams.

The neckline finish with this pattern involves cutting a one inch wide strip of fabric, attaching it to the inside, then folding it around the seam before top-stitching it to the right side. 

It went ok, I serged the first step,  then tried to fold it around the seam.  Smoothly.  Pinning was a pain.  I decided to use 1/4 inch wide steam-a-seam to fuse it down instead.  Brilliant, right?  It went pretty well.   But, when I tried it on, the neckline was stretched out of shape, and steaming it with my iron didn’t help much. 

No picture.

I picked out the top-stitching.

I pulled the fused fold apart.

I picked out the serging.

I threw the neck-strip in the garbage.

Then I steamed the entire neck area back into the right shape.  Now I can start again.  And I have a plan.

I cut a strip of the sweater knit 2 1/4 inches wide and the length of the neckline across the grain.  (mine was 26 inches.  This was pressed in half longways with wrong sides together.  Then I used a narrow zig-zag stitch to baste the edges of the center area together.  I left about 6 inches at each end not basted.

With my top on the ironing board, and matching the center of the band with the center front, I stuck in a pin to hold it.  Then working up one side of the neck, I stretched the basted area of the band while keeping the folded part smooth and stuck pins in the hold it as I went.  When I got to the center back I marked the band with a pin. 

Then I removed the band, leaving a pin in it at the center front and measured between the pins.  That was half of my neck band, times 2 equals the needed length.   The extra was cut off, leaving 1/4 inch at each end for seam allowance.  I joined it with the serger, and after 1/4 pinning, the rest went really well.

The hems were basted in place using Heat & Bond Feather Lite, then cover stitched. 

I love my new sweater!

Jalie Raglan Tee 3245 Completed

Finished! 

I was waiting for a “new-to-me” cover-stitch machine in order to complete the hems.  It arrived, I practiced a bit, then jumped in.  I am really glad I added it to my machine collection.  It was easy to thread and this fabric was a breeze to hem.

I had already fused 1 inch wide strips of a lightweight knit interfacing to the sleeve and bottom hem and pressed the hems along the fold before sewing anything.  That step made the cover-stitching easy.

My disclaimer; I received the piece of beautiful Rayon Spandex in my favourite shades of blue from Distinctive Sewing Supplies in exchange for blogging about my experience.  Please know that the opinions expressed are my own.

The fabric is really comfortable to wear, it’s really soft, and not hot on my skin.   It’s 95% Rayon 5% Spandex, 60 inches or 152 cm wide, and 210 gsm/6.19 osy. What the heck is that????  Click here to read a post by Catherine of Distinctive Sewing Supplies.  It explains it very well.

I’m going to use this pattern again!  With a couple of changes; I’ll shorten it a bit, and raise the neckline by 2 inches at the front.  If I’m not careful, too much of me shows.  I’m going to shorten this one, to “finger-tip length”.  It will still cover my fluffy bits, even when I wear leggings under it, but right now when I look at the photos, I get the impression that it looks “big”.

I’ll add a photo of the shortened version. 

Jalie Raglan Tee 3245

You might recognize this pattern, it’s the same one I used to make the racer-back  cami (view C) shown on the bottom left. 

Read about it by clicking here.

 

I received this piece of fabric from Distinctive Sewing Supplies to make view B, without the pockets.  It’s 60 inches wide and 95% Rayon 5% Spandex

If you want a new Tee for your wardrobe, and like the idea of a raglan sleeve, you need to make this!  All the sewing was complete in an hour, and the hemming will take less than that, so it’s a “2 HOUR TEE”.

I chose to make a size that is 3 up from my body measurements.  That’s my personal choice. 

My suggestion is to measure the finished width of a top or two that you like the fit of and use that as a guide. 

The neck binding went really smoothly, and I love the way this fabric drapes.  A warning though; it’s very soft and stretchy, and my rough hands meant the fabric clung to my fingers.  Hand lotion solved that problem.

My disclaimer; I received the piece of beautiful Rayon Spandex in my favourite shades of blue from Distinctive Sewing Supplies in exchange for blogging about my experience.  Please know that the opinions expressed are my own.

I liked making this pattern so much that I ordered another fabric from Distinctive Sewing Supplies that I’d been lusting after.  It’s a 85% Poly 10% Rayon 5% Spandex and I’ll be sewing it up using this same pattern as soon as possible.  Of course I’m going to make a change, I’ll raise the front neckline by 2 inches.  Watch for a review in a few weeks.

Racerback Cami Jalie 3245 Take 2

My “Take 2”

I love the way this version fits me, close through the shoulders and upper bust, then gently flowing over my fluffy bits.

My disclaimer; I received this piece of beautiful ITY Knit Jersey in my favourite shade of teal from Distinctive Sewing Supplies in exchange for blogging about my experience.  Please know that the opinions expressed will be my own.

I didn’t have quite enough fabric so I creatively pieced the back.  (This isn’t the first time that I felt I had to make a second version of a top because it felt too tight for my liking)

Using my serger, I joined the horizontal seams first, then the vertical seam after using a bit of basting tape to keep the cross seam in place.  I’m pleased with the results.

I changed the front neckline by raising it by 1 and 1/2inches and re-drawing the curve.  The binding band for the new neckline was 95% of the neckline measurement.  (It worked out beautifully)

Then I proceeded as directed in the instructions, by joining the shoulders and the side seams.

I didn’t add the fusible knit interfacing to the binding strips this time, and sewed them on with the right sides facing, then folded in the excess to the back, around the seam allowance, and then top-stitched 1/8″ from the seam. 

I chose to use a rolled edge finish on this version, and did a test run first.  It’s a good thing I did, because I have “pokies”. Can you see how the stitching isn’t smooth?

I solved that by cutting a couple of strips of lightweight water soluble “topper” and serging with the topper on top.

It was worth it.


A bit more…….

I recently purchased a remote “clicker” for my camera, and took a photo of the back of this top.  Notice the “fluff” across the upper back?  And how the fabric is pulled?  I don’t like the way it looks.   If I make this style again, I’m going to widen the back by one inch in that area.

Racerback Cami Jalie 3245

My latest creation, take two.

This top is quick and easy to put together.  But, I have a confession to make, I’ve been overthinking every step of this cami.  I wanted it to be perfect. 

Sew,  it took forever. 

Sew,  I made two.

My disclaimer; I received this piece of beautiful ITY Knit Jersey in my favourite shade of teal from Distinctive Sewing Supplies in exchange for blogging about my experience.  Please know that the opinions expressed will be my own.

This chapter is Take One.

Lets discuss size and ease.  According to the chart on the back of the pattern, my measurements correspond to size “X”.  I went up one size and traced off size “Y”.  (wiggle room)

Then I compared the pattern pieces to my finished scarf collar top in size “BB”, and they were almost the same around the midsection.

It was quick to cut out, and to mark the notches.  I used my serger to sew the shoulders and the side seams.  I like the way the bust is given extra fabric by stretching the back to ease extra into the front. 

I use my rotary cutter to cut the strips for the neck and arm binding, much easier than using scissors on this slippery ITY.  Joining the ends was made easy by sewing over tissue paper. Easy to tear away.

Then quarter pinned, and followed the “Jalie Binding Method” by sewing the right side of the binding to the inside, then folding and rolling it around to the front to be top-stitched.  I’ve used this method successfully many times, so I attached all 3 strips.  

When it was time to top-stitch the folded edge to the front, the fabric fought me all the way.  The cut edge rolled to the right side and created a ripple underneath the top layer that I couldn’t steam out.    Maybe a light weight fusible knit interfacing would help.  I picked out all 3 binding strips WITHOUT MAKING ANY HOLES!!!!

Then I fused the interfacing strips to the wrong sides of all three strips.  And quarter-pinned before attaching just one armhole strip this time.

stabilized binding
quarter pinned binding

The interfacing made it too thick.  I picked it out.  And decided to sew it to the front first with right sides together, then fold it to the inside and top-stitch.  That worked, and I just trimmed off the extra seam allowance on the inside.  Whew!

 

The hem was finished by fusing the same lightweight knit interfacing, cut into one inch wide strips to the hem, then top-stitching with a twin needle.

stabilized curved hem
pinned hem
twin needle hem

Finally, it’s finished!

I pulled it on over my head, smoothed it out and took a peek in the mirror.  If this was a fairy tail the mirror would have cracked. 

It fit tighter than I like, and, being a racer-back style, my bra straps were showing and it was binding under the arms.  No, you may not see a photo.  I didn’t want the camera to break in horror.

The next version will be my next post.